Here is a selection of my blogs, articles, etc., that can be found elsewhere.

Academic Journals

Radical politics and gay activism in the Republic of Ireland, 1974-1990 (Irish Studies Review)

An Irish Diplomat Reports from Armenia, 1983 (Studi Irlandesi)

Irish Times

The Tipperary man who fell in love while fighting in the Spanish Civil War

Mary Mooney, the Mayo woman who campaign for justice for her wronged son

The Dublin-born journalist who became a foreign correspondent in Imperial Russia

Nancy Cunard, the interwar poet and rebel descended from Robert Emmet’s family

Contingent Magazine

The Archive after the Revolution – On researching the lives of Irish radicals in the Moscow archives.

RTÉ Century Ireland
Ireland’s Comintern Generation – The lives and networks of Irish men and women swept up in the world revolution.

History Today
The Suffragettes Who Became Communists

Making History, BBC Radio 4
When the Bolsheviks Came to Dublin – Helen Castor and I discussed my discovery of four Russian revolutionaries in post-Rising Dublin.

History Ireland

‘The Future of Feminism’ The Irish Women’s Franchise League and the World Revolution, 1917-20 – Published in the Global Irish Revolution special issue, April 2019.

‘Red Easter’ Platon Mikhailovich Kerzhentsev, the first Soviet historian of Ireland

Irish Diaspora Histories Network

Radicalising the Irish Diaspora – An Irish anarchist gathering on a London rooftop and the means by which we recover radical histories of the Irish diaspora.

Pubs and Publications
An Insatiable Appetite for Anecdotes – Using the case of an Irish student disciplined for heavy drinking in 1930s Moscow, I discuss the relevance of quirky archival finds.

Fantastic Sources and Where to Find Them – The how and why of tracing living descendants for historical research.

Rambling for Research – Using the cityscape as an inspiration for historical research.

Vocab building for Historians – The benefits of language learning and how to go about it.

Trinity News
Union of Soviets in Ireland – Throughout the 60s and 70s, a curious Cold War fault line divided the Irish student movement. This article for the Trinity student paper discusses its origins.